About Hexpack

Hexpack is an adaptation of piecepack. The hexpack is a public domain game system designed to encourage creative, open game development and design.

The Hexpack was designed by Daniel Wilcox and Nathan Morse.

The hexpack page on BGG

Anatomy of a hexpack

The Short definition:

  • 6 hexes and 12 triangular chits (one set suited, one set with blank backs) – valued blank, ace, 2, 3, 4, 5 – in each of 4 different suits:
    1. suns
    2. moons
    3. crowns
    4. arms (fleur-de-lis)

A standard hexpack is a set of 24 tiles, 48 coins in 4 suits and 6 values, designed to be used with a standard piecepack.

The Long definition:

Standard Color Associations

Arms are blue.
Crowns are green or yellow.
Moons are black.
Suns are red.

Components

24 hexagonal tiles:

  • one per suit/value pair
  • suits are Suns, Moons, Crowns, Arms
  • values are null, ace, 2, 3, 4, 5
  • faces are marked with value at center and small suit symbols at the corners, both colored with the suit color
  • suit backs are marked with black crosses to suggest division into equilateral triangles

24 triangular chits (analogous to piecepack coins):

  • one tile per suit/value pair
  • suits are Suns, Moons, Crowns, Arms
  • values are null, ace, 2, 3, 4, 5
  • faces are marked with value in black (aces are a generic symbol, such as a spiral)
  • backs are marked with suit in the appropriate color
  • both fronts and backs are marked with a small mark near the top edge for directional indication.

24 additional triangular chits (these chits are experimental and are intended for use in tiling the hexes – using them mixed together with the primary chits could cause some confusion, so we’re sorting that out):

  • one tile per suit/value pair
  • suits are Suns, Moons, Crowns, Arms
  • values are null, ace, 2, 3, 4, 5
  • faces are marked with value,a suit, and a directional indicator.
  • backs are unmarked

4 d6 dice (cubic – typically provided by a standard piecepack):

  • one die per suit
  • suits are Suns, Moons, Crowns, Arms
  • values on each die are null, ace, 2, 3, 4, 5
  • die sides are marked with value in color to match suit and possibly a directional indicator.

1 d6 suit selection die (cubic – optional)

  • one d6 is a suit indicator marked with one of each suit, a null, and an ace. All sides have directional indicators.

4 pawns (non-specific shape – typically provided by a standard piecepack):

  • one pawn per color

There are also expansions onto the original hexpack. These include:

  • A Standard Card Deck Pack:
    1. spades
    2. clubs
    3. diamonds
    4. hearts
  • A Seasons Pack:
    1. winter (snowflake)
    2. spring (flower)
    3. summer (fish)
    4. autumn (leaf)
    5. The hexpack is very specifically designed to work with and extend a standard piecepack. A typical piecepack has tiles that are 2″×2″, which perfectly accommodates use of Icehouse pieces, in addition to the standard piecepack pawns and dice. Similarly, a typical hexpack has tiles that circumscribe a circle with a 2″ (~50mm) diameter – which is to say that the distance between sides of a tile is 2″. This size was chosen specifically to allow use of Icehouse Pieces, but also to allow even the large Icehouse pyramid to be laid on its side on a tile, to indicate directionality or vectors.

      Notes for Manufacturers
      The hexpack is public domain; anyone may manufacture and distribute (for profit) hexpacks without pay of royalty or license.
      Hexpacks may certainly (and should be) stylized or personalized; it is merely for compatibility that they conform to the basics outlined in the section above.

      Though not required, you may include the names of the designers of the hexpack, Nathan Morse & Daniel Wilcox, as part of hexpack packaging.
      If you have any questions regarding the hexpack please email us or check out the forums!

Creative Commons License
Hexpack by Nathan Morse & Daniel Wilcox Jr is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License.
Based on a work at www.hexpack.org